The Everyday and Ordinary

If I had to summarize everything that God has been teaching me lately, it would be this:

You can find joy in the seemingly mundane.

Whether you’re reading the book of Numbers or are experiencing an apathetic patch of days right now, there’s no law saying that these things have to be bland. There’s lessons even in the laws and accounts of Numbers. There’s joy even in the ordinary and boring days.

Take, for example, a group of people in Numbers 4 who were assigned by God to carry the many furnishings and structures of the tabernacle whenever God led the Israelites to a new camp:

The Kohathites, the Gershonites, and the Merarites.

And right now, you’re probably already wincing at how strange these names are and how difficult they are to pronounce. And you’re convinced that there’s nothing to be learned with these Israelite names that come up so often in the Bible (usually in the long genealogies, but who’s pointing fingers?).

But hear them out.

God instructed Moses and Aaron to take a census among these three groups of the Levites and count each male aged 30 to 50 years old and qualified to work at the tabernacle. These men would be assigned different parts of the tabernacle to transport.

For the Kohathites, they would be assigned the objects–every piece of furniture and other needed objects necessary for all the offerings.

For the Gershonites, they would be assigned the tabernacle itself and the surrounding area–all the curtains and coverings and screens that made up the tabernacle itself.

For the Merarites, they would be assigned the structures of the tabernacle–the supports, crossbars, posts, bases, tent pegs, ropes, and everything else that held up the tabernacle itself which housed all the furnishings and objects.

It’s easy to overlook the significance of this. One important fact to note is that God chose the Levites to be His appointed priests. And from this clan, God chooses these three groups to carry the tabernacle . . . His dwelling place among His people.

Really, there couldn’t be a greater honor!

And even though carrying furniture, objects, and structures across the wilderness seems ordinary and insignificant, it is not. Each piece is essential to the formation of the tabernacle, which allows God to dwell among His people!

For these men, aged 30 to 50 years old . . . the small contribution each of them had to moving all the parts of the tabernacle was their ministry.

Even the smallest things in our lives can be our ministry.

It’s hard to see the bigger picture when you’re caught up in the details of the everyday and ordinary things. But I challenge you to look beyond these things. What are the everyday, ordinary things that God can use for your ministry?

You don’t have to necessarily serve in the church to have a ministry. A ministry can be as simple as being an ambassador of Christ’s love to your friends, family, roommates, and co-workers. A ministry can be as everyday as forming a text message chain that sends encouraging messages each morning. A ministry can be as ordinary as buying someone you know a meal that you know they have been craving for a while.

God does big, amazing things . . . and He does them through the small details.

So if you have been going through a hard time lately and have been struggling with the mundane, everyday, ordinary things . . .

. . . take heart! Be courageous!

God can use you to show His love to another one of His beloved children. No matter what you have done or where you have been, He can and will use you.

But are you willing to help move the tabernacle?

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